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Four Matters to Make Neuroscience Better

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You may or may not recall your high school or college lectures. It all depends on who did the lecture, the subject, or a little of both. It could have been a talk which you fondly remember. Or, it could be one that made you sleepy.

The World of Neuroscience

When it comes to neuroscience resource information, a lecture should not be dry. On the contrary, there is new information that comes out of this area on a regular basis. To the point that sites like BehavioralHealth2000.com feature long pages of video and audio lectures.

What makes a great neuroscience lecture? Here are four ingredients to consider.

The Speaker

If they talk in a slow, monotone cadence, then there’s a good chance the audience members will get distracted. On the other hand, a lecturer who throws facts out like they were fastballs can lose the audience because they can’t catch up.

Presenters should speak to their audience, not at them. In addition, they should present their information in moderation, so the audience retains the data.

The Information

When speaking to a group trying to understand neuroscience, the big terms need to be locked away unless they are defined. A great lecturer must talk to the audience in a non-condescending way so they can grasp the concepts. In turn, this leads them to learn more.

The Volume

Some lecturers can sound very soft or extremely loud. Both can distract the audience and prevent them from catching all of the important information. A great neuroscience lecture features a speaker who has tested their sound levels ahead of time.

The Knowledge

A great neuroscience lecture should not feature ums, pauses, and the constant checking of notes. This can make the audience feel the speaker isn’t knowledgeable. On the other hand, prepared speakers probably practiced ahead of time to know the data inside and out. Furthermore, if they use ‘um,’ it may be a pause to answer a question instead of not remembering what to say.